Dreary Outside, Self-Isolating Inside

I’m writing this partly as a followup on Thursday’s “Self-Isolation in the Family” post. And partly because I got frustrated with what I’d been trying to write today.

My son is still sick, and it’s a damply dismal Saturday afternoon. Outside temperature is 40 degrees Fahrenheit, 4 Celsius.

With clear skies and sunshine, that’d be brisk.

It’s raining, so I don’t mind staying inside.

There’s a Winter Weather Advisory on from 10:00 tonight until 9:00 tomorrow morning.

This afternoon’s bone-chilling rain will merge into wet snow, accompanied by gusty winds. The National Weather Service described Sunday’s weather as “breezy.”

Roads and streets may not achieve an ultimate skating-rink lack of traction, but I’ll be content to stay inside tomorrow morning.

All of which is part of the ‘springtime in Minnesota’ experience.

Happily, my son is not as sick as he was a few days back. I’ve been hearing fewer unsettling coughs, at any rate. Good news.

He’s still self-isolating. I talked about that a couple days back.

He’s also, so far, the only one of the household who’s blatantly under the weather. Whether or how long that lasts, I don’t know.

Eucharistic Adoration Suspended

The family’s self-isolation went up a notch when Bishop Kettler said that churches should close their doors.

It’s our response to Executive Order 20-20 by Governor Walz.

The Sauk Centre parishes website confirmed that church doors were locked Friday night, and will stay that way.

Among other things, that means that I won’t be doing Eucharistic adoration until after April 10. At least.

I don’t like the situation. But I don’t have to like it. (March 21, 2020)

On the ‘up’ side, Information Age tech lets me read what Bishop Kettler had to say.

Bishop Kettler’s update to pastors
Bishop Kettler’s Statements, Coronavirus Updates and Spiritual Resources for Prayer and Engagement, Diocese of St. Cloud MN (March 27, 2020)

On Wednesday morning, March 25, I participated in a conference call with Gov. Walz and the other Minnesota bishops to talk about the state’s response to the coronavirus outbreak and the important role churches continue to play in meeting the spiritual needs of our people. As you know, later that day, Gov. Walz issued a ‘stay-at-home’ executive order, which is in effect from 11:59 p.m. on Friday, March 27, through Friday, April 10, at 5 p.m.

It is very important to comply with the specific requirements and spirit of the order for the health and well-being of all Minnesotans. Many of you understandably have questions about how this might affect your priestly ministry and parish operations. While it would be impossible to address every question in this regard, I wanted to give you guidance on a few of the most-common questions likely to arise….

“…Q: Can our church buildings remain open to the public for adoration and other prayer?

A: No. I believe keeping churches open for adoration and other prayer would not be within the parameters of the governor’s executive order….”

Another perk from living in the early 21st century: My wife and number three daughter participated via Internet with Pope Francis’ Extraordinary Moment of Prayer and out-of-season Urbi et Orbi blessing.

That’s all I’ve got for now, apart from a reminder about “these few years:”

“Like a drop of water from the sea and a grain of sand,
so are these few years among the days of eternity.
“That is why the Lord is patient with them
and pours out his mercy on them.”
(Sirach 18:812)

More ‘healthy and otherwise’ posts:

About Brian H. Gill

I'm a sixty-something married guy with six kids, four surviving, in a small central Minnesota town. I mostly write and make digital art. I'm only interested in three things: that which exists within the universe; that which exists beyond; and that which might exist.
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2 Responses to Dreary Outside, Self-Isolating Inside

  1. Glad to hear your son is getting better! Sorry about the locked church doors. Here in Ohio, ours are still open, except not for public masses.

Thanks for taking time to comment!